Spring Creek Update #1

Spring Creek Update #1

FWSR submitted two comments on the Spring Creek FPA.

One, written by our attorney, addresses the ways in which the FPA fails to meet legal requirements, including triggers for classification as a Class IV-S requiring a full SEPA.  2020 07 20 Public Comment BRICKLIN & NEWMAN

Our second comment addresses environmental damage that could result from the logging as proposed.  For example, there are three known Western Gray Squirrel (WGS) nests in the area proposed to be logged.  WGS  are in a category known as Priority Habitat Species, along with some species on site.  DNR timber harvest rules do not protect these habitats.  FWSR comment-Spring Creek FPA 2706931

As we have said before, the DNR rules for timber harvest do not adequately protect things that are required under other state laws to be protected.  A SEPA process might produce a higher level of protection.  Might is the operative word.  The best protection is that logging just doesn’t happen on this parcel.

Pat Arnold

Pat Arnold

Pat, her youngest grandchild and some of his classmates looking at the mountain and thinking about poetry 

 

Pat Arnold believes that something organizes the universe, but that something is not us.  Thankfully, we never get to the end of the mysteries about the universe and its ways.  Our task is to exist in harmony with all around us, with reverence, disturbing little, conserving much, and celebrating all.

Pat’s been on the FWSR board for a long time now, and every FWSR board meeting is still fun.  Pat is grateful to the FWSR supporters who have sustained the group since the 1970’s.  Hurrah for past success and onward to new victories!

Pat’s parents were heavily involved with Rachel Carson in environmental work, so her environmental activism education began early.  Pat holds degrees from Vassar College, A.B. sociology and English; the Cambridge-Goddard School for Social Change, M.A.  women’s history; and the California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo, M.S Agriculture.  Pat’s a graduate, Class XVII, of the California Agricultural Leadership Program.  She spent most of her working career in production agriculture.  She moved to Trout Lake in 1991 to take a position as production manager at Trout Lake Farms.

Dave Berger

Dave Berger

 

David left the Bronx, NY for San Francisco back in the 1970s with a Masters Degree in Environmental Engineering and a desire to put his career and life experiences to their best use.  He has since worked throughout the West as a consultant and inspector for various private organizations as well as federal, state, and municipal agencies in the fields of water and air quality as well as with hazardous waste issues.  He was eventually invited to create an Environmental Engineering program at Portland Community College where he worked for 23 years before retiring.

During his tenure at PCC, David travelled to Africa (Kenya, Tanzania, Mali), Mexico, as well as statewide to promote renewable and solar energy projects.

Since his retirement, David has dedicated his time to local environmental and water quality issues.  You can find him cleaning and sampling our nearby rivers and lakes, maintaining hiking trails, tutoring high school students, and promoting a major global transition from fossil fuels to a renewable energy system. He is a dedicated volunteer of the Columbia Gorge Ecology Institute (now GEO — Gorge Ecology Outdoors,) Friends of Trees, Columbia Riverkeeper, Solar Energy International, the Oregon Conservancy Foundation, and, of course, Friends of the White Salmon River.

David resides in Lyle, Washington with his wife Julie and spends as much time as he can with his grandchildren.

Tom Binder

Tom Binder

Tom Binder spent his 20s in Trout Lake Valley doing a variety of woods work, including firefighting, tree planting, tree thinning, and setting chokers and chasing landing under a high lead.
He returned to school and took a Bachelor’s Degree in Nutritional Sciences in 1985 from Central Washington University in Ellensburg,

then a Master’s degree in Nutritional Sciences from Texas Woman’s University in Houston. He worked as a clinical nutritionist and college-level instructor before retiring to Trout Lake in 2016.

Jeremy Bisson

Jeremy Bisson

Jeremy was born and raised in Washington state and is currently living in Trout lake WA. Before he could walk, his father would take him on to the river where he enjoyed playing in and near the water. Soon he began to enjoy fishing, rafting and kayaking in some of Washington’s most pristine rivers. Most of his days involve at least one trip down the river in his kayak.