Outfitters’ Licensing Renewal

 

FWSR, along with many others,  received notification from the Forest Service on April 27 about renewal of outfitters permits.  We are working on a response.  We think the proposed action, to simply renew the existing permits, is not okay.  Here is a link to a map of the W&S segments of the two rivers.   You can contact us at friends@friendsofthewhitesalmon.org if you have questions or opinions.

A couple weeks ago, we posted the Scoping Letter sent by the US Forest Service regarding Outfitter Permits.

We have filed our comment letter, asking for more examination of the other Outstandingly Remarkable Values and for consideration of a system of daily limits, to be phased in slowly over the next several years. The FWSR comment letter can be read in full here:  FWSR.Response.Outfitter.Permits.Scoping.May2020-1.

 

Check on current alerts and updates here

 

 

News Categories

Follow Us On Facebook

Friends of the White Salmon River
Friends of the White Salmon River
A friend in Trout Lake posts about coyotes she sees close to home. I so wish that we all shared her appreciation for these beings.
Friends of the White Salmon River
Friends of the White Salmon River
We are considering an appeal to the Gottschalk decision. Not sure it's possible; not sure it's practical. Exploring both. Here are two photos showing the damage that's occurred on this parcel over the last few years. First (top) from 2010 before logging. Second (bottom) from 2018. That one's a little hard to see, given the shadows (don't know if Google Earth would let me get rid of the shadows).
Friends of the White Salmon River
Friends of the White Salmon River
Interesting research in the Alsea watershed in coastal Oregon. This link is to a news release, with a link in the article to the research report. It doesn't appear to address rotations shorter than 40-50 years.
“Results of this study indicated that 40- to 50-year rotations of Douglas-fir plantations can produce persistent, large, summer low-flow deficits,” Segura said. “While the clear-cutting of these plantations, with retention of riparian buffers, increased daily streamflow slightly, streamflow did not return to where it was before the harvesting of those mature forests, which apparently do not use as much water.”
“Results of this study indicated that 40- to 50-year rotations of Douglas-fir plantations can produce persistent, large, summer low-flow deficits,” Segura said. “While the clear-cutting of these plantations, with retention of riparian buffers, increased daily streamflow slightly, streamflow did not return to where it was before the harvesting of those mature forests, which apparently do not use as much water.”https://today.oregonstate.edu/news/timber-harvesting-results-persistent-deficits-summer-streamflow?fbclid=IwAR1hj6embnkbCSw6Zn-K8BTWczU6nOEqlHUM156PFi1L1vE4tSUqPhh98go#.YR5wvH-4iGh.facebook

ARCHIVES